January 12; It is Better to Give and Give (With the Humility of a Servant’s Heart)
MANAGEMENT BY THE BOOK:
365 Daily Bible Verse &
One-Minute Management Lessons For The Busy Faithful

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12 January

…whoever wants to be first must be slave of all.

Mark 10:44

It is Better to Give and Give (With the Humility of a Servant’s Heart)

Give Credit

In his First Inaugural Address, on January 21, 1981 Ronald Reagan said, “There is no limit to what a man can do or where he can go if he doesn’t mind who gets the credit.”

As the vision for your organization comes into focus, the mission of the leader must first be understood. Research shows happiness will follow when personal goals serve other people, whatever the external benchmark the CEO uses for success. Managers at the top of the org chart should be the true servant-leaders noted in the good news of the Gospels.

So how does the manager get started?

The leader must look at presenting her long-term vision, indeed every communication, as a sales transaction: Somebody is buying; somebody is selling. The best sales professionals and the best CEOs know that the best deals are made when the other party is made happy.

Win-win negotiating and all that.

What is the first thing the wanna-be-boss can practice to be the servant of all?

The easiest way is to buy servant-hood. No, that can’t be purchased with cash — but with organizational capital. That is to say: Give Credit.

Giving credit to others is a form of servant-hood. It’s a way of selling yourself as leader of the team. Receiving recognition creates happiness. In both buyer and seller. Being the “slave” to your staff is the best path toward getting profitable employee buy-in.

Basketball Hall of Famer, Dean Smith, the ‘gentleman and coach’ of the UNC Tar Heels would say,

…I wanted tangible evidence that North Carolina’s players and coaches recognized and appreciated a good pass that led to a basket. UCLA’s coaching great John Wooden and I talked about it far back as the mid-1960s, when he said he wanted the recipient of a pass that led to a basket to say thank you to the passer or wink at him.

That was a good idea, but I wanted a stronger, more visible signal of thanks. I preferred a gesture that the fans could see. The media too. So we asked the player who scored to point to the man who gave him the pass that resulted in the basket, to show appreciation for an unselfish act that helped the team…Thank the passer by pointing to him…It became contagious…(Dean Smith).

A slave owns nothing. The presidential-servant keeps nothing–not even credit. Give it away.…whoever wants to be first must be slave of all. Mark 10:44

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